7th International Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable, June 23-24, 2017 University of Toronto

Clinical Judgment:
Multidisciplinary Perspectives

June 22, 2017
University of Toronto

7th International Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable:
Medicine, Public Health and Healthcare

June 23-24, 2017
University of Toronto

You are warmly invited to attend the 7th International Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable at the University of Toronto, with the theme “Medicine, Public Health and Healthcare”. The Roundtable will include the Ruggles Lecture in the Philosophy of Medicine on June 23, followed by a reception to celebrate recent work in the philosophy of medicine.

Registration is also open for a symposium at the University of Toronto on the preceding day titled ‘Clinical Judgment: Multidisciplinary Perspectives’, featuring perspectives from philosophy, psychology, the humanities, medicine, and medical education research.

Registration for the Clinical Judgment Symposium and for the Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable, as well as information about both events and about accommodations can be found here: http://research.lunenfeld.ca/PhilOfMed/?page=Home

Attendees are encouraged to register and secure accommodation early as June 22-24 falls during Pride Week in Toronto, and accommodations will book up soon.

A list talks can be found below.

We hope to see you there!

Local Organizers: Jonathan Fuller, Benjamin Chin-Yee and Ross Upshur.

Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable Scientific Committee: Rachel Ankeny, Alexander Bird, Alex Broadbent, Havi Carel, Fred Gifford, Harold Kincaid, Miriam Solomon, Julian Reiss, Jeremy Simon, David Teira.

Clinical Judgment:
Multidisciplinary Perspectives
June 22, 2017

Talks/Panels:

Ross Upshur (University of Toronto) with Benjamin Chin-Yee (University of Toronto) – “Clinical Judgment: Surveying the Philosophical Landscape”

Benjamin Djulbegovic (University of South Florida) – “Rational Clinical Decision-Making: Implications for Overtreatment and Undertreatment”

Luis Flores (King’s College London) with Jonathan Fuller (University of Toronto) – “Clinical Judgment: The Bayesian Approach”

Peter Schwartz (Indiana University) – “Clinical Judgment about Disclosure: Should Patients be Told their Comparative Risk?”

Panel – “Evidence, Risk, and Reasoning”
Commentary by Mark Tonelli (University of Washington)
Discussants: Mark Tonelli (moderator), Ross Upshur, Benjamin Djulbegovic, Peter Schwartz and Luis Flores

Paul Thagard (University of Waterloo) – “The Logic and Psychology of Psychotherapeutic Assessment” (coauthor: Laurette Larocque)

Geoff Norman (McMaster University) – “The Role of Experience in Clinical Reasoning: A Psychological Perspective”

Maria Mylopoulos (University of Toronto) – “Adaptive Expertise: Perspectives and Application in Medical Education”

Kathryn Montgomery (Northwestern University) “Knowledge Needed to Treat: Clinical Judgment in a Scientific Field”

Panel – “Philosophy and Psychology of Clinical Judgment”
Commentary by Miriam Solomon (Temple University)
Discussants: Miriam Solomon (moderator), Paul Thagard, Maria Mylopoulos, Geoff Norman and Kathryn Montgomery

International Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable:
Medicine, Public Health and Healthcare
June 23-24, 2017

Ruggles Lecture in the Philosophy of Medicine
Maya Goldenberg (Guelph University), “Reframing the Problem of Vaccine Hesitancy”

Keynote, Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable
Paul Thagard (University of Waterloo), “Explaining Mental Illness”

Talks:

Alex Broadbent (University of Johannesburg), “What Are Doctors Good At?”

James Krueger (University of Redlands), “Treatment, Cure, and Care”

Jonathan Fuller (University of Toronto), “Medicine Lost in ‘Translation’: The Structure and Aim of Medical Science”

Sean Valles (Michigan State University), “Linking Individual Health and Population Health with a Life Course Concept of Health”

Lynette Reid (Dalhousie University), ““Modes of this Complex Form of Life”: Concepts and Inductive Kinds in Medicine”

Juliette Ferry (Université Paris-Sorbonne), “Toward a Dialogue Between Phenomenology of Medicine and Naturalism”

Margherita Benzi (University of Eastern Piedmont) and Mattia Andreoletti (European Institute of Oncology), “Assessing Causality of Adverse Events During Early-Phase Cancer Clinical Trials: A Philosophical Perspective”

Sarah Wieten (Durham University), “Putting Rigour Back into Pragmatic Trials” (coauthor: Donal Khosrowi (Durham University))

Mary Walker (Monash University), “Population-Level Evidence and Patient-Specific Medical Devices: Evaluating Interventions with Inherent Variation”

Mark Tonelli (University of Washington), “Epistemology of Precision Medicine” (coauthor: Brian Shirts (University of Washington))

Lindley Darden (University of Maryland, College Park), “Representing and Discovering Disease Mechanisms”

Samantha Copeland (NMBU), “Effectual and Mechanistic Reasoning in Medical Research: The Case of Deep Brain Stimulation”

Angela Coventry (Portland State University) and Bryan Cwik (Portland State University), “Locke’s Philosophy of Medicine”

Cecilia M. Calderón-Aguilar (UNAM), “The Place of Surgery in the Philosophy of Medicine” (coauthor: Arantza Etxeberria-Agiriano (UPV/EHU))

Laura Cupples (University of South Carolina), “Patient-Reported Outcome Measures, Conceptual Convergence, and Implications for Policy Making”

Saana Jukola (Bielefeld University), “On Contested Science and the Ideals for Evidence – The Case of Nutrition Research”

Anke Bueter (Leibniz Universität Hannover), “Sex, Drugs, and How to Deal with Criticism: The Case of Flibanserin” (coauthor: Saana Jukola (Bielefeld University))

Atocha Aliseda (UNAM), “Clinical Reasoning as an Integrative Task”

Abraham Schwab (IPFW), “Robust Epistemic Humility”

Elisabetta Lalumera (Università di Milano-Bicocca), “Over-Utilization of Diagnostic Imaging: Conceptual Issues”

7th Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable: Medicine, Public Health and Healthcare

7th Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable:

Medicine, Public Health and Healthcare

June 23-24, 2017
University of Toronto

The next biennial Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable will be held at the University of Toronto on June 23-24, 2017 (call for abstracts below).

It will be preceded by a symposium on June 22 at the University of Toronto titled ‘Clinical Judgment: Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives’. Roundtable attendees are warmly invited to attend the symposium (details coming soon).

Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable: Call for Abstracts
We welcome papers in any area of philosophy of medicine, public health or healthcare, including epistemological and metaphysical issues in medicine (but not bioethics), from a variety of philosophical approaches. We particularly encourage submissions focused on epistemological issues related to population and public health. To submit an abstract, please upload a 500-word abstract to EasyChair by 1 February 2017. Abstracts will undergo blinded review and should not contain information that will allow identification of the author. The submission link is below:

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=philmed2017

Questions regarding submissions or the Roundtable should be directed to Jonathan Fuller (jonathan.fuller@mail.utoronto.ca) and Jeremy Simon (jeremy.simon@nyu.edu).

Local Organizers: Jonathan Fuller, Benjamin Chin-Yee and Ross Upshur.

Scientific committee: Rachel Ankeny, Alexander Bird, Alex Broadbent, Havi Carel, Fred Gifford, Harold Kincaid, Miriam Solomon, Julian Reiss, Jeremy Simon, David Teira.

This Roundtable is supported by the Faculty of Medicine, Medical Alumni Association, and Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto.

Too Much Medicine: Exploring the Relevance of the Philosophy of Medicine to Medical Research and Practice

Too Much Medicine: Exploring the Relevance of the Philosophy of Medicine to Medical Research and Practice
Conference
April 19-21
University of Oxford (UK)

Confirmed speakers:
Philosophers of medicine
Professor Alexander Bird (Bristol, UK)
Medical researchers
Professor Lisa Schwartz and Professor Steve Woloshin (Dartmouth, US) [TO BE CONFIRMED]
Professor Ben Djulbegovic (Florida, US)
Dr. Jeffrey Aronson (Oxford)

Call for Papers
This cross-disciplinary conference will explore the emerging problem of ‘too much medicine’ (TMM) including overdiagnosis and overtreatment. TMM is likely to benefit from an interdisciplinary perspective for several reasons. One cause of TMM is arguably ‘disease mongering’ where for example risk factors are interpreted as diseases and treated as such. This is related to the philosophical problem of defining disease—without a clear definition of what counts as diabetes or cancer, harmful and costly tests and treatments can be introduced unchecked. Also, the problem of TMM provides a platform for broader issues. For example it highlights the importance of considering values alongside evidence—some might value being given a test even without an improved clinical outcome. The conference seeks to address the problem of TMM issue from an interdisciplinary perspective, especially the interface between medicine and philosophy. Papers engaging with philosophical aspects of the Too Much Medicine question are invited, with potential topics including: the role of evidence based medicine in the Too Much Medicine question, the values underlying the problem, and unique aspects of the problem in particular branches of medicine. See website for more details: https://philmedlab.wordpress.com/2016/11/28/first-blog-post/).

Selected papers from the conference in a special issue of the Journal for Applied Philosophy.

How to submit an abstract
We welcome abstracts from philosophers of medicine with ideas that may be relevant to medicine, and medical researchers/practitioners with ideas that may be relevant to philosophy are encouraged to submit abstracts.
Abstracts (no more than 200 words) to be sent no later than 28 February 2017 to: philmedlab@mail.com. Do not include your name on the document to permit blinded review. Please be sure to emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of your talk

How to register if you would like to attend without giving a talk
The cost of the conference is £50 for two days and includes all talks, morning/afternoon tea and coffee, and lunch.

Please reserve your place by sending an email to: philmedlab@mail.com no later than 28 February 2017.

Bursaries
Two £200 bursaries are available for UK students (including graduate students)

Organizing committee
Philosophers
Professor Alexander Bird (Bristol)
Dr. Jeremy Howick (Oxford)
Professor Havi Carel (Bristol)
Professor Alexander Broadbent (Johannesburg)
Dr. Ashley Graham Kennedy (Florida Atlantic)
Dr. Sean Valles (Michigan State)
Dr. Raffaella Campaner (Bologna)

Medical researchers
Professor Ben Djulbegovic (University of South Florida)
Ms. Charlotte Albury (Oxford)
Dr. Andrew Papanikitas (Oxford)
Dr. Andrew Moscropp (Oxford)
Professor Jeffrey Aronson (Oxford)

And in an advisory capacity:
Professor Edward Harcourt (Oxford).

Mechanisms in medicine

Mechanisms in medicine
July 3-5 2017
Centre for Reasoning, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK

Mechanisms in medicine

Keynote speakers
Raffaela Campaner (University of Bologna)
Daniel Commenges (Bordeaux Population Health Research Center)
Jeremy Howick (Oxford University)
Stathis Psillos (University of Athens)
Daniel Steel (The University of British Columbia)
Kurt Straif (International Agency for Research on Cancer)
John Worrall (LSE)

Background
Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a relatively recent technique for supporting clinical decisions by the current best evidence. While it is uncontroversial that we should use the current best evidence in clinical decision making, it is highly controversial what the best evidence is. EBM considers evidence from clinical trials, in particular, randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews of those trials to be the best evidence. On the other hand, evidence of mechanisms that is obtained by means other than clinical trials is considered to be of low quality.
However, there is a growing body of literature that highlights the many benefits of considering evidence of mechanisms alongside evidence from clinical trials. For instance, evidence of mechanisms is crucial for interpreting clinical trials, establishing a causal claim, and extrapolating from the trial population to the treatment population.
This conference seeks to explore whether and in which ways evidence of mechanism may improve medical decision making. The conference will bring together philosophers and medical researchers.

Call for papers
Please submit an abstract of up to 500 words on or before 1st February 2017 via email to c.wallmann-520@kent.ac.uk. The final decision on submissions will be made by 1st March. A special session will be dedicated to contributions submitted by PhD candidates.
Contributions should address questions such as the following:
– How can we get evidence of mechanisms in medicine?
– How can evidence of mechanisms best be considered alongside evidence of correlation to evaluate causal claims in medical research and health policy?
– How can quality of evidence of mechanisms be characterised?
– Which accounts of causality best fit the programme for integrating evidence of mechanisms with evidence of correlation?
– How can evidence of mechanisms be employed in extrapolation?
– How can evidence of mechanisms inform statistical and graphical models in medicine?

Registration
Registration is free but compulsory. There are a limited number of places so please register early. Please register via email to c.wallmann-520@kent.ac.uk

Organisation
This conference is organised by Christian Wallmann on behalf of the Centre for Reasoning at the University of Kent and the EBM+ consortium. It is an activity of the project Evaluating evidence in medicine, funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council.
For any queries please contact Christian Wallmann: c.wallmann-520@kent.ac.uk

Cologne Medical Epistemology Workshop

Sven Bernecker and Bennett Holman are hosting the Cologne Medical Epistemology Workshop October 18th from 11:30-18:30

This is a one day workshop that will be held at the University of Cologne, Main Building, BT4 3rd Floor room 4.202 The workshop brings together a number of scholars to present their latest work in medical epistemology. All are welcome to attend.

Bennett Holman (Yonsei University (Seoul, South Korea))
Philosophers on Drugs

Lara Keuck (Humboldt-Universität Berlin)
Blurred Boundaries in Medicine

Saana Jukola (Universität Bielefeld)
On Communal safeguards for objectivity and public trust: The case of research on sugar and health

Helmut Kiene (Universität Witten/Herdecke),
Single Case Causality Assessment in Medical Treatment

Cristina Amoretti (University of Genoa),
What Kind of Evidence for Evidence Based Medicine

Philosophy & Medicine Symposium: Self-Knowledge In and Out of Illness

The newly launched interdisciplinary journal Palgrave Communications will publish a special issue based on the symposium. The content of the publication will not be limited to the content of the symposium, but is open to all. We therefore warmly invite all researchers working on the topic of the symposium to submit their articles to be considered for publication in this special issue. Please, see the official Call for Papers for further information:

http://www.palgrave-journals.com/palcomms/authors/call-for-papers#Self-knowledge

Philosophy & Medicine Symposium: Self-Knowledge In and Out of Illness

Self-knowledge has always played a role in health care since a person needs to be able to accurately assess her body or behaviour in order to determine whether to seek medical help. But more recently it has come to play a larger role, as health care has moved from a more paternalistic model to one where the patient is expected to take charge of her health; as we realized that early detection, and hence self-examination, can play a crucial role in outcomes; as medical science improves and makes more terminal illnesses into chronic conditions requiring self-management; as genetic testing makes it possible to have more information about our futures; and with the advent of personal electronic devices that make it easy for a person to gather accurate real-time information about her body.

It can be hard to get good information about oneself, and even harder to know what to do it. Sometimes self-knowledge is needed for a good outcome, but sometimes it is useless, or worse. Breast self-examination can lead to over-treatment, learning that one has a predisposing gene can create a detrimental illusion of knowing more about the future than one does, and data about one’s vital signs can be meaningless if taken out of a context of interpretation. We look at how these and other issues play out in a variety of medical contexts.

Venue: Greenwood Lecture Theatre & Harris Lecture Theatre (Hodgkin Building), Guy’s Campus, King’s College London.

Time: From Tuesday 03 May 2016 09:00 to Wednesday 04 May 2016 17:00.

Event on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1011144088950110

Event on PhilEvents:
http://philevents.org/event/show/22110

PROGRAMME

Tuesday 3 May 2016 09:00-17:30 – Greenwood Lecture Theatre
– Tony David, IoPPN, King’s College London:
Self-reflection in illness and health – literal and metaphorical?
– Nick Shea, King’s College London:
Metacognition for acting and deciding together
– Fiona Johnson, University College London:
Self-Perception of weight: Is a little knowledge a dangerous thing?
– Matthew Hotopf, IoPPN, King’s College London:
Big data, Big Brother and the internet of things: the challenges of implementing mobile health
– Paul Norman, Universtity of Sheffield:
Psychological aspects of Breast Self-examination
– Quassim Cassam, University of Warwick:
Self-knowledge in diagnosis and self-diagnosis
– Fiona Cowdell and Judith Dyson, University of Hull:
Skin self-examination
– Reception, all in attendance are welcome

Wednesday 4 May 2016 09:00-17:00 – Harris Lecture Theatre, Hodgkin Building
– Christine Patch, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals:
Genetic screening: tales from the real world
– Sherri Roush, King’s College London:
Hypochondria and self-re-calibration
– Sacha Golob, King’s College London:
Self-cultivation and self-knowing: knowledge as style
– Veronika Williams, University of Oxford:
“I just know” – experiences of self-managing acute exacerbations in COPD
– Havi Carel, University of Bristol:
Self-knowledge in illness
– Tim Holt, University of Oxford:
Sailing close to the wind: models and metaphors for the self-management of diabetes

For programme updates please visit:
http://philosophyandmedicine.org/events/symposium-self-knowledge-in-and-out-of-illness

The event is free and open to the public. No advance booking required.

CALL FOR PAPERS The newly launched interdisciplinary journal Palgrave Communications will publish a special issue based on the symposium. The content of the publication will not be limited to the content of the symposium, but is open to all. We therefore warmly invite all researchers working on the topic of the symposium to submit their articles to be considered for publication in this special issue. Please, see the official Call for Papers for further information:

http://www.palgrave-journals.com/palcomms/authors/call-for-papers#Self-knowledge

The event is hosted by Philosophy & Medicine, a joint venture between King’s Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, and The Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery with generous support from the Peter Sowerby Foundation. Find more to do at:

http://philosophyandmedicine.org/

https://twitter.com/philandmed

http://philosophyandmedicine.org/events/symposium-self-knowledge-in-and-out-of-illness/